The Kinks

The Kinks

 

Info

The Kinks were an English rock band formed in Muswell Hill, North London, in 1963 by brothers Dave and Ray Davies. They are regarded as one of the most important and influential rock groups of the era.[1][2] The band emerged in 1964 during the height of British rhythm and blues and Merseybeat, and were briefly part of the British Invasion of the US until their touring ban in 1965. Their third single, the Ray Davies penned "You Really Got Me",[2][3] became an international hit, topping the charts in the United Kingdom and reaching the Top 10 in the United States.[4] Between the mid-1960s and early 1970s, the group released a string of hit singles; studio albums drew good reviews but sold less than compilations of their singles. They gained a reputation for reflecting English culture and lifestyle, fuelled by Ray Davies' observational writing style.[2] Albums such as Face to Face, Something Else, The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society, Arthur, Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround and Muswell Hillbillies, along with their accompanying singles, are considered among the most influential recordings of the period.[1][3][5]

After a fallow period in the mid Seventies, the band experienced a revival during the late 1970s and early 1980s with albums Sleepwalker, Misfits, Low Budget, Give the People What They Want and State of Confusion. In addition, groups such as Van Halen, the Jam, the Knack, the Pretenders and the Fall covered their songs, helping to boost the Kinks' record sales. In the 1990s, Britpop acts such as Blur and Oasis cited the band as a major influence.[1] The Kinks broke up in 1996, a result of the commercial failures of their last few albums and creative tension between the Davies brothers.[6]

Their music was influenced by a wide range of genres, including rhythm and blues, British music hall, folk and country. Ray Davies (lead vocals, rhythm guitar) and Dave Davies (lead guitar, vocals) remained members throughout the group's 32-year run. Longest serving member Mick Avory (drums and percussion) was replaced by Bob Henrit formerly of Argent in 1984. Original bassist Pete Quaife was replaced by John Dalton in 1969 and Dalton was in turn replaced by Jim Rodford in 1978. Session keyboardist Nicky Hopkins accompanied the band in the studio for many of their recordings in the mid-late 1960s. In 1969 keyboardist John Gosling joined the band, making them an official five-piece, while Ian Gibbons replaced him in 1979, playing in the band until its eventual demise.

The group had five Top 10 singles on the US Billboard chart. Nine of their albums charted in the Top 40.[7] In the UK, the group had seventeen Top 20 singles and five Top 10 albums.[8] Four of their albums have been certified gold by the RIAA. Among numerous honours, they received the Ivor Novello Award for "Outstanding Service to British Music".[9] In 1990, the original four members of the Kinks were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame,[2][3] as well as the UK Music Hall of Fame in November 2005.

Labels

Highlights11

Lola
 
"Lola" is a song written by Ray Davies and performed by English rock band the Kinks on their album Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One.
Arthur
 
Arthur (Or the Decline and Fall of the British Empire) is the seventh studio album by English rock band the Kinks, released in October 1969.
You Really Got Me
 
"You Really Got Me" is a song written by Ray Davies and performed by English rock band the Kinks.
Come Dancing
 
"Come Dancing" is a 1982 song written by Ray Davies and performed by British rock group the Kinks on their 1983 album State of Confusion.

Photos - The Kinks47

Popular Albums35

Album Appearances & References1

Popular Live Albums4

Popular Songs77

Song Appearances & References8

Minor Film Appearances & References3

TV Shows2

Minor Musical Appearances & References1

Collaborators & Influencers7

Other Music-Related Relationships18

Awards & Nominations2

Events2

Popular Band Members9

You May Also Be Interested In24

Videos8

Spotify - Albums & Singles116

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Spotify - Appears On2

 
 

Spotify - Top Tracks10

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

News Articles5

The Kinks
BBC  –  April 16, 2016
The Kinks were an English rock band formed in Muswell Hill ... The band emerged in 1964 during the height of British rhythm and blues and Merseybeat, and were briefly part of the British Invasion of the US until their touring ban in 1965.
Watch Mumford & Sons cover The Kinks and AC/DC
Gigwise  –  March 8, 2016
Watch footage below. The Brits were headlining this year’s Okeechobee Music Festival in Florida and were joined by Morello, as well as The Avett Brothers and Preservation Hall Jazz Band, to perform covers of The Kinks, AC/DC, Bruce Springsteen ...
Watch Mumford & Sons cover The Kinks and AC/DC with Tom Morello
NME  –  March 8, 2016
The British band were headlining this year's Okeechobee Music Festival in Florida when they were joined by Morello, as well as The Avett Brothers and Preservation Hall Jazz Band to perform covers of The Kinks, AC/DC Bruce Springsteen, The Animals and more.
The Kinks, “Come Dancing”
American Songwriter  –  April 10, 2016
Many of the leading lights of British rock and roll from the ’60s and ’70s found themselves ... Others pretended as if nothing had changed and sounded completely out of touch. The Kinks were able to sidestep these issues for the most part because ...
“Father Christmas” – Bad Religion (The Kinks Cover) [YouTube Official Audio Stream]
zumic.com  –  May 4, 2016
The L.A. punks are no strangers when it comes to turning festive songs into punk rock sing-a-longs, as proven by last year’s album Christmas Songs. For “Father Christmas,” Bad Religion maintain the same energy as The Kinks original, and add their ...